Browsing all articles by Jason Rice, Author at PIXELS OR DEATH.

Unnecessary Mountain: A Review of Battle Princess of Arcadias

Unnecessary Mountain: A Review of Battle Princess of Arcadias 

Sometimes less is more.
It’s an adage that can be applied to pretty much any creative pursuit, be it writing, cooking, or fashion. Videogames have begrudgingly acknowledged its importance due to technical limitations – the diminutive storage space of old school cartridges and other physical media a silicone vice on their …

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Deep Breathing: A Review of 1001 Spikes

Deep Breathing: A Review of 1001 Spikes 

There’s something immensely comforting about 8bit Fanatics’ 1001 Spikes.
For all its seemingly arbitrary ‘masocore’ trappings – a genre built on broken controllers and unvarnished obscenities, popularized by stuff like Super Meat Boy and deepcut I Want To Be The Guy – it’s actually an impossibly fair game. Everything works according …

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999 Hours: A Review of Mugen Souls Z

999 Hours: A Review of Mugen Souls Z 

When I was 16, I maxed out the game clock in Final Fantasy VII. I did every single thing you could, from killing the unfathomably difficult Ruby and Emerald Weapons to breeding a Gold Chocobo and finding the Knights of the Round Summon.
The sad part? I didn’t even like the …

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Ten Hours With Mugen Souls Z

Mugen Souls Z is both the question and the answer at the center of this game.
What is Mugen Souls Z?
It’s Mugen Souls Z.
It’s a curiosity, an intentionally niche game that harkens back to titles from the early PS2 era — think the original Disgaea — that cemented the divide between …

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Not So Alone In The Dark: A Review of Daylight

Not So Alone In The Dark: A Review of Daylight 

I’m standing in front of a bleak looking metal door, my hand resting lightly on the X button. I’ve been here before, in games like Silent Hill or Resident Evil, contemplating whether or not my desire to progress is worth whatever horror lay on the other side of the door. …

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Inoffensively Unremarkable: A Review of Ethan: Meteor Hunter

Inoffensively Unremarkable: A Review of Ethan: Meteor Hunter 

Ethan: Meteor Hunter reminds me a lot of the film Krull.
Released in 1983, Krull was one in a long line of “space operas” that grabbed firmly onto the coattails of the Star Wars films and held on for dear life. There are strange aliens, a powerful artifact weapon (the Glaive), …

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The Hidden Joys of Puppeteer’s Multiplayer

The Hidden Joys of Puppeteer’s Multiplayer 

Last year’s Playstation 3 exclusive Puppeteer has an amazing cooperative multiplayer mode.
It’s nothing life changing — there are no horde modes, persistent faction-based deathmatch, or even microtransactions — but it’s delightfully inclusive and represents the nebulous joy at the center of Puppeteer that can’t be captured in a back-of-the-box quote.
Puppeteer’s …

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Unnecessarily Uncouth: A Review of The Witch and the Hundred Knight

Unnecessarily Uncouth: A Review of The Witch and the Hundred Knight 

Nippon Ichi Software have a good idea about what it means to be evil. Best known for the Disgaea games, which often put you in the shoes of the bad guy, NIS has built a reputation on the macabre and unsettling.
So it’s no surprise that The Witch and the Hundred …

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The Last Of Us: Left Behind Is Pretty Awesome

The Last Of Us: Left Behind Is Pretty Awesome 

SPOILERS AHOY FOR BOTH THE LAST OF US AND LEFT BEHIND.
Left Behind is the perfect kind of post-release DLC. It doesn’t retread over the same broken earth of the main game, nor does it layer glitzy padding on top of it. Instead, it simply augments it, teasing out one of …

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Mass Effect Could Learn From Assassin’s Creed 4

Mass Effect Could Learn From Assassin’s Creed 4 

Mass Effect is still my favorite of Bioware’s seminal trilogy. Even now — clunky mechanics and stiff controls aside — it’s the only game in the series to honestly inspire me. Everything about it, from Jack Wall’s haunting soundtrack to the cool blues that dominate the color palette, set it …

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