The used game market.

Yesterday, The Verge revealed the next phase of Gamestop’s master plan to consume the last of our dollars in exchange for digital shenanigans. The gaming megastore wants to expand their digital sales inventory to include “classic games” no longer available in their physical stores.

Basically, a Gamestop executive finally did a search for old SNES games on Ebay and realized that there’s a huge market for older merchandise to which people willingly offer buckets of cash in sacrifice. And they want those buckets. Never fear, however, because this is actually a great thing for the used/classic/whatever-we’re-calling-old-games market.

It makes perfect sense, honestly. The company has up to this point been sitting on a dragon’s horde of outdated games and equipment. It doesn’t make sense to clean it all up and ship around to different stores hoping someone will take it off their hands.

Of course, Gamestop isn’t exactly known for giving a good deal to people looking to sell their old stuff or to people trying to buy it. Many times, used trade-ins give a relatively paltry amount compared to the initial price of the product (I was once offered $14 for an iPod Touch), but are then turned around for much higher prices and the profits needed to keep corporeal game stores afloat. So how is this such a good deal for the customers?

Simple — it will average out the wild range of dollars people may ask for a particular title, as can be seen via websites like Amazon or Ebay. Once The Big G gets this part of their operation up and running, there will finally be a baseline for prices on which every other store or individual seller can start working from.

Granted, these prices will initially be based off of Gamestop’s own research into availability and what people are willing to shell out for certain item, but over time they should reflect the market attitudes. That’s the kind of power Gamestop has over sales as one of the few corporate titans. And anyone looking to make a few bucks off their collection or offer up trades for a particularly juicy title will soon have a database to reference and help avoid scams or lousy deals.

  • mpscrimshaw

    I was once offered 25 cents for several games I had brought in to trade in. The guy behind the counter told me that they were “actually worthless” and he was “doing me a favor”. Really? I gave in mostly because the games were terrible and I just wanted them gone but seriously?

  • mpscrimshaw

    I was once offered 25 cents for several games I had brought in to trade in. The guy behind the counter told me that they were “actually worthless” and he was “doing me a favor”. Really? I gave in mostly because the games were terrible and I just wanted them gone but seriously?